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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
, to stop clean energy policies in the u.s., and that is the basis of a deadlock here in doha. so let's take it to the next question: what can be done then in washington to minimize the power of these incredibly wealthy men? >> well i mean, as you know washington is kind of -- has kind of become formalized legalized corruption. this is something that's got to start outside of washington. it already is. what we see is a groundswell of organized labor, communities of color, of environmental organizations, not just climate groups, are following the money and see that it's all leaveding to the kochs. they are not only the biggest source of financing for attacking collective bargaining rights, voter rights clean air, healthcare, but, as you know they bundled, you know, almost a billion dollars with their other conservative allies for the 2012 e elections. >> let's talk about what's going on doha as these talks wind doubt. a lot of us have been frustrated watching knowing that the united states is not leading. what has been accomplished? and what is preventing the
people in the u.s. and caused billions of dollars of damage. unless you live in one of the affected areas you probably think things are back to norm. but that's because the media is barely cleaning up the cleanup efforts. in new york city, they're living in third world conditions, raw sewage continues to flow into water ways. thousands still have no power and direct subway service is not expected to return into the middle of next year. >> we were up to five feet of water. it was not water but it was all cesspool so it was sewage water. >> how much can a body tank. >> blankets, two socks three sweaters and gloves. >> they have got garbage they're cleaning in other areas and putting it on the beach here, yet we have still have garbage here. >> it's the way life is. >> jennifer: thousands of volunteers have flocked to the rockaways to help with the cleanup efforts tonight coming from new york, dr. sabaya, welcome to the war room. >> i'm having difficulty hearing you. >> jennifer: i can hear you, just a little bit faint. >> a little bit faint. hopefully they can turn up your microphone becaus
was levi strauss. now, 140 years later 450 million pairs of jeans are sold every year in the u.s. alone. now, you would think with that volume, the manufacturing process would be totally mechanized but actually a lot of it is still done by hand. a typical pair of jeans is made from 15 individual pieces, someone has to oversee cutting all of those pieces and sew them together and as you can see in this discovery channel documentary, the seams get ironed out flat then the zipper and the rivets are attached and finally, because who wants new-looking jeans they get distressed. workers put them on giant rubber legs that get blown up like balloons and then they give some rough treatment to them so they really look like they came out of a california mine. now, that discovery channel documentary might show satisfied workers happily doing their jobs but the truth is that kind of work is really hard. it requires a lot of tough manual labor. and for that, american companies have gone overseas and specifically to bangladesh. that c
, and the hands off posture the u.s. has taken, there is no way we're going to be able to keep those good-paying middle class jobs in america. you need to have an active government to enable us to do that. >> yes, we lost all of those years. you had the unfortunate job of being the governor of michigan while george w. bush was president. but the bush plan was part and parcel to what we're seeing now. and actually before bush it happened to the governor before you who was there for -- i don't know how long? 12 years? >> jennifer: yeah. >> but this really started with ronald reagan, when he fired the air traffic controllers. and maybe we can talk about this in the next segment, because i would like to offer some constructive criticism of what we need to do now. >> jennifer: yes, i totally want to do that. but i just want to ask you a question, though, because i know you said that you were done making movies, but i -- i -- i reject that, because even though you think that you were banging your head against the wall with roger and me if you leave the -- the communication c
sign the petition. when nixon started the war 40 years ago, it was the u.s.'s pressure on the un to start the war. so we're looking to them to have a forward thinking idea and allow countries to experiment with what works for them. >> jennifer: your film has been likened to an inconvenient truth. will you be personally going around and showing the film in the same way that al gore did? >> i think it was a wonderful thing, but i think it was probably the best documentary of all time but it really started the global conversation, and it's a brilliant thing to be likened to that, and i really hope it starts the conversation and is the catalyst that creates real change in the conversation. >> jennifer: but will we see you, sam, branson on the road? >> a bit. but this is more about the people in the film. >> jennifer: that was a conversation i had with sam branson earlier. he is the producer of "breaking the taboo." there are some ideas that don't work out so well and brett ehrlich is next. stick around. make your mark with ink. >> my name is kimberly fowler and i
. he claimed u.s. sovereignty so the tea party is now in from its right flank. it's not just about the united nations. 24 hours an speaker john boehner put a budget offer on the table the tea party is threatening to throw him over board. what is his great plan? raising revenues--aah. the details are pretty vague, but we know his plan would raise $800 billion in revenue closing some unnamed loopholes while sparing the top earners from any more taxes. tea partyers object to raising any revenue at all. on the other side the president is not pleased with boehner's plan because he said there would be no deal without higher tax rates for the wealthy. >> obama: if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made, and the further reforms and entitlements that i'm prepared to make, then we're going to have to say the rates on the top 2% go up, and we're not able to get a deal without it. >> jennifer: and jay carney piled on the g.o.p. plan. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we're talking about in terms of actual legisl
-americans. if i'm a republican, i have a shorter path maybe to become a governor. or a u.s. senator. maybe it is just ambition and not anything else. >> jennifer: all right. donnie fowler, thank you my friend. appreciate you coming in. up next, just because someone is a leader doesn't mean that they exhibit leadership. i'm going to give you my thoughts on that difference right after this. >> jennifer: the now to my point, in june of 1944, around 150,000 brave men were asked to storm the beaches of normandy. at risk to themselves, they accepted the challenge on behalf of their nation and the world. they were heroes. they were leaders. imagine if we had leaders today with as much courage as each of those soldiers had in just one of their fingers. this gun debate and the fiscal cliff and frankly all important and difficult issues demand leaders who are willing to be personally uncomfortable. what are willing to lean into an oncoming storm rather than be blown along with it. the men at normandy risked their lives for what was right.
expensive cities in the u.s. how do you make ends meet on your current salary? >> my current salary, i help out with whatever i can with my mom. she's retired under her social security and pension. it makes me feel real bad i can't do more so what will happen if she dies? where will i be? what would i do? >> jennifer: so the only way you're able to survive is by living with your mom at 59 years old. >> yes. >> jennifer: jonathan, why has it been so hard to unionize fast food workers in the past? >> well, i think the idea that many people believed was that fast food workers were temporary workers, were teenagers working after school jobs when in fact, it is just not true, especially after the recession when so many people lost their full-time jobs. and had to rely on fast food work and other work. they have families to support. they have to put food on the table. they have to survive. and to be honest, people just can't make it and you know, i think it is at a tipping point where people in the industry just can't take
makes us safer. welcome to the u.s.a. where of some you will find it's easier to buy a weapon designed to kill a lot of people in a short amount of time than it is to marry who you love or vote where you want or send your kids to kindergarten. we now live in a society where the aurora, colorado, shooter could buy 6,000 rounds of ammo online and tommy chung went to jail for selling bombs. it is painfully obvious... we need change in this country! and the good news, the majority of americans and the majority of gun owners agree. in fact, a new ppp poll finds that the majority of americans and the majority of gun owners support banning assault weapons and closing the gun show loophole. but the nra opposes both of those measures and in the past, the nra has successfully fought gun control legislation by threatening to attack any politician who doesn't take their hard line. even after last year's tragic gabby giffords shooting, gun control introduced by chuck schumer and carolyn mccarthy could not get passed congressi
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)